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Spot Fake UGG Boots

Christmas is just around the corner, and gift-buying season beckons (that is, if it hasn’t already started in earnest in your locality yet)! So start thinking and looking for gifts now, or else you’ll end up doing 11th-hour Christmas shopping, just when prices have already gone up!

Thinking of buying shoes as gifts for Christmas? Sheepskin boots would make for an ideal gift at this time of the year, because of the ice-cool temperatures brought about by winter. And if you and me are on the same “wavelength”, what better sheepskin boots to give than a pair of genuine, honest-to-goodness “UGG Australia” sheepskin boots, right? As they say, “give nothing but the best!” But the problem is, where should you look for authentic “UGG Australia” sheepskin boots? Sure, you might say that ‘there are actually lots of stores in my area selling authentic “UGG Australia” sheepskin boots, but are you sure that they are, indeed, authentic “UGG Australia” sheepskin boots? And are you even remotely aware of the “controversy” or””dispute” between Australian bootmakers and the American company that makes the authentic “UGG Australia” sheepskin boots? If you are not aware of this so-called “controversy or “dispute”, then check out the Wikipedia article about UGG Boots.

Now that you have spent some time educating yourself about the American and Australian “interpretation” of the word “UGGs” and the background behind the “UGG Australia” controversy, let’s move forward as I show you the cheap fake ID ways by which you can distinguish a pair of genuine “UGG Australia” sheepskin boots from fake ones. Let me begin, however, by saying that all of my “hints”, “pointers”, notes and remarks that follow are applicable ONLY to “UGG Australia” boots found in an “actual” store and not a “virtual” one (such as those “online” stores and/or “retailers”), okey? For purposes of conciseness or brevity, I”ll talk about spotting fake UGGs among “virtual” or “online” stores in another discussion.

Let’s start the ball rolling by talking about the PRICE. Genuine “UGG Australia” sheepskin boots are quite expensive. I won’t mention any figures, because prices vary and change from time to time. But here’s what I sUGGest you can do to “root out” obvious fakes: if there are several stores offering UGGs in your area, check out each and everyone’s prices. If they”re all bunched together within a small range, that means 1.) Either they are all selling genuine UGGs, which is good; or 2.) They are all selling fakes, which is too bad. My point is, if one store offers a price that is significantly much, much lower than the others, then, in any language, that’s a giveaway that that store is selling fake UGGs.

Now, suppose they all indeed sell UGGs in a tightly-bunched price range. What should you do next? Check out their LOOKS. Here are several visible ‘telltale signs” that give away fakes:

  • If one or all of a particular boot’s labels (both outside and inside) show “Made in Australia” or “Made in New Zealand”, then those definitely are fakes. Because Deckers has been manufacturing them in China for quite some time now.
  • If the quality of the stitching is very bad, then it’s a fake. Of course, it might be difficult to distinguish “very bad” from “bad” and from “good”, but if it is obviously very bad, then the boots are fakes.
  • Look at the store’s black-colored UGGs. Geniune black-colored UGGs have black-colored soles and black labels with the “UGG” logo in white, whereas fake “black” UGGs have tan-colored soles and brown (or non-black) labels.
  • Ask for the “Nightfall” model. If the “Nightfall” presented to you is any other color but Chestnut, it is a fake. Deckers only makes “Nightfall” in Chestnut.
  • If a blue card or a brown “leather” pinned-on tag (some of these might say “Made by CGM Co. Ltd.”), or a dust bag in a light brown or beige colour saying
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